It’s time to start playing with your food.
This Plate Roulette, designed and sold by Veinticuatrodientes, is a stroke of genius.
Place a pizza or cake or any other easily divisible edible item on it, and the person who bites the bullet wins! Or loses! Or does the dishes!
Want one?

It’s time to start playing with your food.

This Plate Roulette, designed and sold by Veinticuatrodientes, is a stroke of genius.

Place a pizza or cake or any other easily divisible edible item on it, and the person who bites the bullet wins! Or loses! Or does the dishes!

Want one?

Look who’s published on the Bon Appetit website! :)

Look who’s published on the Bon Appetit website! :)

Guess what I’ll be cooking up this weekend! 
Thanks, goddessofscrumptiousness!

STIR-FRIED SRIRACHA SHRIMPS
Spicy with an Asian barbecue hint… very Rice worthy! :)
(I have to wrestle in a recipe post, it’s been a long while since I posted a new one.)
Ingredients:
1 pound medium-size shrimps (heads removed and peeled)
1 Tablespoon Sriracha
1 Tablespoon Oyster Sauce
Salt and Pepper
2 Tablespoons butter
5 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 cup green onions, thinly sliced
1 Jamaican long pepper, chopped fine
Procedure:
1. Marinate shrimps in sriracha, oyster sauce, salt and pepper for 5-10 minutes.
2. Place wok or skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter then saute garlic until softened and fragrant (1 minute).
3. Add the Jamaican long pepper and green onion and saute aromatics for another minute.
4. Add the shrimps into the sauteed aromatics and toss or “stir-fry”. Cook for no longer than 2 minutes or until shrimps curl-up (shrimps can overcook in a matter of seconds).
5. Serve with steamed rice or toasted baguette slices.
Makes 2-3 servings

Guess what I’ll be cooking up this weekend! 

Thanks, goddessofscrumptiousness!

STIR-FRIED SRIRACHA SHRIMPS

Spicy with an Asian barbecue hint… very Rice worthy! :)

(I have to wrestle in a recipe post, it’s been a long while since I posted a new one.)

Ingredients:

1 pound medium-size shrimps (heads removed and peeled)

1 Tablespoon Sriracha

1 Tablespoon Oyster Sauce

Salt and Pepper

2 Tablespoons butter

5 cloves garlic, minced

1/4 cup green onions, thinly sliced

1 Jamaican long pepper, chopped fine

Procedure:

1. Marinate shrimps in sriracha, oyster sauce, salt and pepper for 5-10 minutes.

2. Place wok or skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter then saute garlic until softened and fragrant (1 minute).

3. Add the Jamaican long pepper and green onion and saute aromatics for another minute.

4. Add the shrimps into the sauteed aromatics and toss or “stir-fry”. Cook for no longer than 2 minutes or until shrimps curl-up (shrimps can overcook in a matter of seconds).

5. Serve with steamed rice or toasted baguette slices.

Makes 2-3 servings

Throw out the ketchup and pack away the mustard. 
Fried Mac and Cheese is the ultimate burger topping!

Courtesy: anarchyandscotch.

Throw out the ketchup and pack away the mustard. 

Fried Mac and Cheese is the ultimate burger topping!

Courtesy: anarchyandscotch.

Pizzamisu

Just when you though junk food couldn’t get any, well, “junkier” Jasmin at 1 Fine Cookie has taken it to another level. 

Pizza in jars. Layering raw pizza ingredients in conveniently sized jars that can be carried anywhere and baked at any time. 

Insanity? Or genius? You decide.

 Ever since I arrived in the USA in July, my roommate has been providing me with exhaustive knowledge on American culture in well-chosen and enlightening “Welcome to America!” moments. 
 This, along with her Type-A personality, leads to creation of several lists: the wonders of Febreze, the steps involved in setting up a cable connection and several lists of American junk foods that she cannot believe I have never indulged in.
 A few months ago, she made a list of T-foods that formed the very crux of growing up in America (or so she led me to believe) - and leading the list was the all American vanilla cream-filled Twinkie. I promised her I would rush out and buy some immediately, but I lingered, and still haven’t tasted a single one. 
 Today, reading Mark Bittman's opinion column in The New York Times on the Fall of the Twinkie, I realize that time’s running out. With Hostess (the manufacturing company) filing for bankruptcy protection yet again, I must get me a piece of this American sentimentality before it’s too late. And so should you!

Ever since I arrived in the USA in July, my roommate has been providing me with exhaustive knowledge on American culture in well-chosen and enlightening “Welcome to America!” moments. 

This, along with her Type-A personality, leads to creation of several lists: the wonders of Febreze, the steps involved in setting up a cable connection and several lists of American junk foods that she cannot believe I have never indulged in.

A few months ago, she made a list of T-foods that formed the very crux of growing up in America (or so she led me to believe) - and leading the list was the all American vanilla cream-filled Twinkie. I promised her I would rush out and buy some immediately, but I lingered, and still haven’t tasted a single one. 

Today, reading Mark Bittman's opinion column in The New York Times on the Fall of the Twinkie, I realize that time’s running out. With Hostess (the manufacturing company) filing for bankruptcy protection yet again, I must get me a piece of this American sentimentality before it’s too late. And so should you!

 Monday marks the beginning of the Chinese year of the Dragon, but in contrast to the gargantuan, fire-breathing monster, New York caterer Peter Callahan is offering up bite sized treats to mark the occasion. 
 These spicy chicken horsd’Oeuvres are shaped like fortune cookies, but made from wonton wrappers and stuffed with a spicy chicken filling. The set also comes with paper fortunes and tiny Chinese take-out boxes for serving.
 Priced at $36 onwards for three dozen, you can get them at www.petercallahan.com or call in at (212) 327 1144. And if you’re feeling adventurous, you can try making them at home! Use the Spicy Chicken and Cilantro recipe, and serve with store-bought sweet chili or Sriracha hot sauce.
Photo courtesy The New York Times.

Monday marks the beginning of the Chinese year of the Dragon, but in contrast to the gargantuan, fire-breathing monster, New York caterer Peter Callahan is offering up bite sized treats to mark the occasion. 

These spicy chicken horsd’Oeuvres are shaped like fortune cookies, but made from wonton wrappers and stuffed with a spicy chicken filling. The set also comes with paper fortunes and tiny Chinese take-out boxes for serving.

Priced at $36 onwards for three dozen, you can get them at www.petercallahan.com or call in at (212) 327 1144. And if you’re feeling adventurous, you can try making them at home! Use the Spicy Chicken and Cilantro recipe, and serve with store-bought sweet chili or Sriracha hot sauce.

Photo courtesy The New York Times.

At last, at Condé Nast.

Today I started my internship at Bon Appetit magazine. 

With three other interns, in a not-so-roomy intern room, I spent one of the busiest days of my working life. Yes, there was a lull. It was the first five minutes. Then the emails started. 

Soon, I was talking to chefs from New York and San Francisco about their signature recipes, hunting through 1977 issues for long lost recipes, listening to an avid foodie talk about the benefits of parsley for 30 minutes and running to and from B&H Photo to pick up a remote timer camera for the dudes in the photo department. 

All of this, whilst trying to fit in extensive research on food of all kinds to come up with story pitches.

We did manage a twenty minute lunch, albeit at 3pm, and swiping in and out of the building and magazine offices with our newly authorized badges was pretty darn amazing.

My pillow beckons (and at 11pm, will you believe?) and my eyes are closing as I write this, but all I can say is, can’t wait to wake up and do it all again! :)

When chicken just isn’t enough.
‘
‘

1796foods:

607. Kangaroo and 608. Ostrich
For my brother’s birthday, we had an ‘Exotic Meats Barbecue’. We got four different weird meats - kangaroo, ostrich, kudu, and zebra - and everyone tried a little piece of each. The only one I’d tried before was ostrich, and that was as a burger. They all had similar tastes to an extent, they were gamey, and as obvious as it sounds, steak-like. I definitely had my favourites though. Kangaroo tasted good to start but had a slightly odd aftertaste that I’m not sure if I was so keen on. Zebra was probably the strongest of them all (I haven’t tried horse so I’m not sure if it tastes similar, though I guess that it would). Kudu was similar to springbok which I’ve had before and that was pretty nice, as was the ostrich. It was really fun to try all the different meats.
608 down, 1188 to go

When chicken just isn’t enough.

1796foods:

607. Kangaroo and 608. Ostrich

For my brother’s birthday, we had an ‘Exotic Meats Barbecue’. We got four different weird meats - kangaroo, ostrich, kudu, and zebra - and everyone tried a little piece of each. The only one I’d tried before was ostrich, and that was as a burger. They all had similar tastes to an extent, they were gamey, and as obvious as it sounds, steak-like. I definitely had my favourites though. Kangaroo tasted good to start but had a slightly odd aftertaste that I’m not sure if I was so keen on. Zebra was probably the strongest of them all (I haven’t tried horse so I’m not sure if it tastes similar, though I guess that it would). Kudu was similar to springbok which I’ve had before and that was pretty nice, as was the ostrich. It was really fun to try all the different meats.

608 down, 1188 to go